Breaking Dawn The Twilight Saga Book

Great love stories thrive on sacrifice. Throughout (, , and ), Stephenie Meyer has emulated great love stories–Romeo and Juliet, Wuthering Heights–with the fated, yet perpetually doomed love of Bella (the human girl) and Edward (the vampire who feeds on animals instead of humans). In Breaking Dawn, the fourth and final installment in the series, Bella’s story plays out in some unexpected ways. The ongoing conflicts that made this series so compelling–a human girl in love with a vampire, a werewolf in love with a human girl, the generations-long feud between werewolves and vampires–resolve pretty quickly, apparently so that Meyer could focus on Bella’s latest opportunity for self-sacrifice: giving her life for someone she loves even more than Edward. How close she comes to actually making that sacrifice is questionable, which is a big shift from the earlier books. Even though you knew Bella would make it through somehow, the threats to her life, and to her relationship with Edward, had previously always felt real. It’s as if Meyer was afraid of hurting her characters too much, which is unfortunate, because the pain Bella suffered at losing Edward in New Moon, and the pain Jacob suffered at losing Bella again and again, are the fire and the heart that drive the whole series. Diehard fans will stick with Bella, Edward, and Jacob for as many twists and turns as possible, but after most of the characters get what they want with little sacrifice, some readers may have a harder time caring what happens next. (Ages 12 and up) –Heidi Broadhead

Product Description
This Special Edition of the #1 New York Times bestseller includes:

  • An exclusive Breaking Dawn concert series DVD, featuring a performance by Blue October’s Justin Furstenfeld and a conversation between Stephenie Meyer and Justin Furstenfeld.
  • A reproduction of the personal, handwritten lyrics for My Never by Justin Furstenfeld.
  • A limited-edition, full-color Bella & Edward poster (on reverse side of book jacket).
  • And more!

The astonishing, breathlessly anticipated conclusion to The Twilight Saga, Breaking Dawn, illuminates the secrets and mysteries of this spellbinding romantic epic that has entranced millions.

More from Stephenie Meyer

–This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly It might seem redundant to dismiss the fourth and final Twilight novel as escapist fantasy–but how else could anyone look at a romance about an ordinary, even clumsy teenager torn between a vampire and a werewolf, both of whom are willing to sacrifice their happiness for hers? Flaws and all, however, Meyer’s first three novels touched on something powerful in their weird refraction of our culture’s paradoxical messages about sex and sexuality. The conclusion is much thinner, despite its interminable length. […] But that’s not the main problem. Essentially, everyone gets everything they want, even if their desires necessitate an about-face in characterization or the messy introduction of some back story. Nobody has to renounce anything or suffer more than temporarily–in other words, grandeur is out. This isn’t about happy endings; it’s about gratification. A sign of the times? Ages 12–up. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

The Shack

Review When the imagination of a writer and the passion of a theologian cross-fertilize the result is a novel on the order of “The Shack.” This book has the potential to do for our generation what John Bunyan’s “Pilgrim’s Progress” did for his. It’s that good! –Eugene Peterson, Professor Emeritus of Spiritual Theology, Regent College, Vancouver, B.C.

Finally! A guy-meets-God Novel that has literary integrity and spiritual daring. “The Shack” cuts through the cliches of both religion and bad writing to reveal something compelling and beautiful about life’s integral dance with the Divine. This story reads like a prayer–like the best kind of prayer, filled with sweat and wonder and transparency and surprise. When I read it, I felt like I was fellowshipping with God. If you read one work of fiction this year, let this be it. –Mike Morrell, zoecarnate.com

“The Shack” is a one of a kind invitation to journey to the very heart of God. Through my tears and cheers, I have been indeed transformed by the tender mercy with which William Paul Young opened the veil that too often separated me from God and from myself. With every page, the complicated do’s and don’t that distort a relationship into a religion were washed away as I understood Father, Son and Holy Spirit for the first time in my life. –Patrick M. Roddy, ABC News Emmy Award winning producer –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author Wm. Paul Young was born a Canadian and raised among a Stone Age tribe by his missionary parents in the highlands of former New Guinea. He suffered great loss as a child and young adult and now enjoys the “wastefulness of grace” with his family in the Pacific Northwest.

The Help

From Publishers Weekly Starred Review. Four peerless actors render an array of sharply defined black and white characters in the nascent years of the civil rights movement. They each handle a variety of Southern accents with aplomb and draw out the daily humiliation and pain the maids are subject to, as well as their abiding affection for their white charges. The actors handle the narration and dialogue so well that no character is ever stereotyped, the humor is always delightful, and the listener is led through the multilayered stories of maids and mistresses. The novel is a superb intertwining of personal and political history in Jackson, Miss., in the early 1960s, but this reading gives it a deeper and fuller power. A Putnam hardcover (Reviews, Dec. 1). (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From In writing about such a troubled time in American history, Southern-born Stockett takes a big risk, one that paid off enormously. Critics praised Stockett’s skillful depiction of the ironies and hypocrisies that defined an era, without resorting to depressing or controversial clich√©s. Rather, Stockett focuses on the fascinating and complex relationships between vastly different members of a household. Additionally, reviewers loved (and loathed) Stockett’s three-dimensional characters—and cheered and hissed their favorites to the end. Several critics questioned Stockett’s decision to use a heavy dialect solely for the black characters. Overall, however, The Help is a compassionate, original story, as well as an excellent choice for book groups.

Inferno

Amazon Exclusive: Inside InfernoExplore the sights of Inferno alongside Robert Langdon in this exclusive first look at Dan Brown’s latest thriller.

Amazon Exclusve: Additional Reading Suggestions from Dan Brown

  • The Divine Comedy: Volume 1: Inferno—(Penguin Classics)
  • The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology—Ray Kurzweil (Author)
  • Brunelleschi’s Dome—Ross King (Author)
  • The Lives of the Artists Volume 1—Giorgio Vasari (Author), George Bull (Translator)
  • The Book Of Symbols: Reflections On Archetypal Images—ARAS

Q&A with Dan Brown

Q. Inferno refers to Dante Alighieri´s The Divine Comedy. What is Dante’s significance? What features of his work or life inspired you?

A. The Divine Comedy—like The Mona Lisa—is one of those rare artistic achievements that transcends its moment in history and becomes an enduring cultural touchstone. Like Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, The Divine Comedy speaks to us centuries after its creation and is considered an example of one of the finest works ever produced in its artistic field. For me, the most captivating quality of Dante Alighieri is his staggering influence on culture, religion, history, and the arts. In addition to codifying the early Christian vision of Hell, Dante’s work has inspired some of history’s greatest luminaries—Longfellow, Chaucer, Borges, Tchaikovsky, Liszt, Monteverdi, Michelangelo, Blake, Dalí—and even a few modern video game designers. Despite Dante’s enduring influence on the arts, however, most of us today have only a vague notion of what his work actually says—both literally and symbolically (which, of course, is of great interest to Robert Langdon). A few years ago, I became very excited about the prospect of writing a contemporary thriller that incorporated the philosophy, history, and text of Dante’s timeless descent into The Inferno.

Q. Where did do your research for Inferno? How long did you spend on it?

A. Researching Inferno began with six months of reading, including several translations of The Divine Comedy, various annotations by Dante scholars, historical texts about Dante’s life and philosophies, as well as a lot of background reading on Florence itself. At the same time, I was poring over all the new scientific information that I could find on a cutting edge technology that I had decided to incorporate into the novel. Once I had enough understanding of these topics to proceed, I traveled to Florence and Venice, where I was fortunate to meet with some wonderful art historians, librarians, and other scholars who helped me enormously.

Once this initial phase of research was complete, I began outlining and writing the novel. As is always the case, when a book begins to take shape, I am drawn in unexpected directions that require additional research. This was also the case with Inferno, which took about 3 years from conception to publication.

With respect to the process, the success of these novels has been a bit of a Catch-22. On one hand, I now have wonderful access to specialists, authorities, and even secret archives from which to draw information and inspiration. On the other hand, because there is increased speculation about my works in progress, I need to be increasingly discreet about the places I go and the specialists with whom I speak. Even so, there is one aspect of my research that will never change—making personal visits to the locations about which I’m writing. When it comes to capturing the feel of a novel’s setting, I find there is no substitute for being there in the flesh…even if sometimes I need to do it incognito.

Q. What kind of adventure will Robert Langdon face this time? Can you give us any sneak peak at the new novel?

A. Inferno is very much a Robert Langdon thriller. It’s filled with codes, symbols, art, and the exotic locations that my readers love to explore. In this novel, Dante Alighieri’s ancient literary masterpiece—The Divine Comedy—becomes a catalyst that inspires a macabre genius to unleash a scientific creation of enormous destructive potential. Robert Langdon must battle this dark adversary by deciphering a Dante-related riddle, which leads him to Florence, where he finds himself in a desperate race through a landscape of classical art, secret passageways, and futuristic technology.

Q. What made Florence the ideal location for Inferno?

A. No city on earth is more closely tied to Dante Alighieri. Dante grew up in Florence, fell in love in Florence, and began writing in Florence. Later in life, when he was exiled for political reasons, the longing he felt for his beloved Florence became a catalyst for The Divine Comedy. Through his enduring poem, Dante enjoyed the “last word” over his political enemies, banishing them to various rings of Inferno where they suffered terrible tortures.

From Publishers Weekly The threat of world overpopulation is the latest assignment for Brown’s art historian and accidental sleuth Robert Langdon. Awakening in a Florence hospital with no memory of the preceding 36 hours, Langdon and an attractive attending physician with an oversized intellect are immediately pursued by an ominous underground organization and the Italian police. Detailed tours of Florence, Venice, and Istanbul mean to establish setting, but instead bog down the story and border on showoffmanship. Relying on a deceased villain’s trail of clues threaded through the text of Dante’s The Divine Comedy, the duo attempt to unravel the events leading up to Langdon’s amnesia and thwart a global genocide scheme. Suspension of disbelief is required as miraculous coincidences pile upon pure luck. Near the three-quarters point everything established gets upended and Brown, hoping to draw us in deeper, nearly drives us out. Though the prose is fast-paced and sharp, the burdensome dialogue only serves plot and back story, and is interspersed with unfortunate attempts at folksy humor. It’s hard not to appreciate a present day mega-selling thriller that attempts a refresher course in Italian literature and European history. But the real mystery is in the book’s denouement and how Brown can possibly bring his hero back for more. Agent: Heide Lange, Sanford J. Greenberger Associates. (May)

Gone Girl: A Novel

On the day of their fifth wedding anniversary, Nick’s wife Amy disappears. There are signs of struggle in the house and Nick quickly becomes the prime suspect. It doesn’t help that Nick hasn’t been completely honest with the police and, as Amy’s case drags out for weeks, more and more vilifying evidence appears against him. Nick, however, maintains his innocence. Told from alternating points of view between Nick and Amy, Gillian Flynn creates an untrustworthy world that changes chapter-to-chapter. Calling Gone Girl a psychological thriller is an understatement. As revelation after revelation unfolds, it becomes clear that the truth does not exist in the middle of Nick and Amy’s points of view; in fact, the truth is far more dark, more twisted, and more creepy than you can imagine. Gone Girl is masterfully plotted from start to finish and the suspense doesn’t waver for one page. It’s one of those books you will feel the need to discuss immediately after finishing because the ending doesn’t just come; it punches you in the gut. –Caley AndersonFrom Author Gillian Flynn

You might say I specialize in difficult characters. Damaged, disturbed, or downright nasty. Personally, I love each and every one of the misfits, losers, and outcasts in my three novels. My supporting characters are meth tweakers, truck-stop strippers, backwoods grifters …

But it’s my narrators who are the real challenge.

In , Camille Preaker is a mediocre journalist fresh from a stay at a psychiatric hospital. She’s an alcoholic. She’s got impulse issues. She’s also incredibly lonely. Her best friend is her boss. When she returns to her hometown to investigate a child murder, she parks down the street from her mother’s house “so as to seem less obtrusive.” She has no sense of whom to trust, and this leads to disaster.

Camille is cut off from the world but would rather not be. In , narrator Libby Day is aggressively lonely. She cultivates her isolation. She lives off a trust fund established for her as a child when her family was massacred; she isn’t particularly grateful for it. She’s a liar, a manipulator, a kleptomaniac. “I have a meanness inside me, real as an organ,” she warns. “Draw a picture of my soul and it’d be a scribble with fangs.” If Camille is overly grateful when people want to befriend her, Libby’s first instinct is to kick them in their shins.

In those first two novels, I explored the geography of loneliness–and the devastation it can lead to. With Gone Girl, I wanted to go the opposite direction: what happens when two people intertwine their lives completely.I wanted to explore the geography of intimacy–and the devastation it can lead to. Marriage gone toxic.

Gone Girl opens on the occasion of Amy and Nick Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. (How romantic.) Amy disappears under very disturbing circumstances. (Less romantic.) Nick and Amy Dunne were the golden couple when they first began their courtship. Soul mates. They could complete each other’s sentences, guess each other’s reactions. They could push each other’s buttons. They are smart, charming, gorgeous, and also narcissistic, selfish, and cruel.

They complete each other–in a very dangerous way.

Review “Ice-pick-sharp… Spectacularly sneaky… Impressively cagey… Gone Girl is Ms. Flynn’s dazzling breakthrough. It is wily, mercurial, subtly layered and populated by characters so well imagined that they’re hard to part with — even if, as in Amy’s case, they are already departed. And if you have any doubts about whether Ms. Flynn measures up to Patricia Highsmith’s level of discreet malice, go back and look at the small details. Whatever you raced past on a first reading will look completely different the second time around.”
—Janet Maslin, New York Times

“An ingenious and viperish thriller… It’s going to make Gillian Flynn a star… The first half of Gone Girl is a nimble, caustic riff on our Nancy Grace culture and the way in which ”The butler did it” has morphed into ”The husband did it.” The second half is the real stunner, though. Now I really am going to shut up before I spoil what instantly shifts into a great, breathless read. Even as Gone Girl grows truly twisted and wild, it says smart things about how tenuous power relations are between men and women, and how often couples are at the mercy of forces beyond their control. As if that weren’t enough, Flynn has created a genuinely creepy villain you don’t see coming. People love to talk about the banality of evil. You’re about to meet a maniac you could fall in love with.”
Jeff Giles, Entertainment Weekly

“An irresistible summer thriller with a twisting plot worthy of Alfred Hitchcock. Burrowing deep into the murkiest corners of the human psyche, this delectable summer read will give you the creeps and keep you on edge until the last page.”
—People (four stars)

“[A] thoroughbred thriller about the nature of identity and the terrible secrets that can survive and thrive in even the most intimate relationships. Gone Girl begins as a whodunit, but by the end it will have you wondering whether there’s any such thing as a who at all.”
Lev Grossman, Time

“How did things get so bad? That’s the reason to read this book. Gillian Flynn — whose award-winning Dark Places and Sharp Objects also shone a dark light on weird and creepy, not to mention uber dysfunctional characters — delves this time into what happens when two people marry and one spouse has no idea who their beloved really is.”
USA Today, Carol Memmott

“It’s simply fantastic: terrifying, darkly funny and at times moving. The minute I finished it I wanted to start it all over again. Admirers of Gillian Flynn’s previous books, Sharp Objects and Dark Places, will be ecstatic over Gone Girl, her most intricately twisted and deliciously sinister story, dangerous for any reader who prefers to savor a novel as opposed to consuming it whole in one sitting….”
Associated Press, Michelle Weiner

“Gillian Flynn’s third novel is both breakneck-paced thriller and masterful dissection of marital breakdown… Wickedly plotted and surprisingly thoughtful, this is a terrifically good read.”
Boston Globe

“That adage of no one knows what goes on behind closed doors moves the plot of Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn’s suspenseful psychological thriller… Flynn’s unpredictable plot of Gone Girl careens down an emotional highway where this couple dissects their marriage with sharp acumen… Flynn has shown her skills at gripping tales and enhanced character studies since her debut Sharp Objects, which garnered an Edgar nod, among other nominations. Her second novel Dark Places made numerous best of lists. Gone Girl reaffirms her talent.” 
South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Oline Cogdill

“A great crime novel, however, is an unstable thing, entertainment and literature suspended in some undetermined solution. Take Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, the third novel by one of a trio of contemporary women writers (the others are Kate Atkinson and Tana French) who are kicking the genre into a higher gear… You couldn’t say that this is a crime novel that’s ultimately about a marriage, which would make it a literary novel in disguise. The crime and the marriage are inseparable. As Gone Girl works itself up into an aria of ingenious, pitch-black comedy (or comedic horror — it’s a bit of both), its very outlandishness teases out a truth about all magnificent partnerships: Sometimes it’s your enemy who brings out the best in you, and in such cases, you want to keep him close.”
Salon

“Ms. Flynn writes dark suspense novels that anatomize violence without splashing barrels of blood around the pages… But as in her other books, Ms. Flynn has much more up her sleeve than a simple missing-person case. As Nick and Amy’s alternately tell their stories, marriage has never looked so menacing, narrators so unreliable.” 
Wall Street Journal

“A portrait of a marriage so hilariously terrifying, it will make you have a good hard think about who the person on the other side of the bed really is. This novel is so bogglingly twisty, we can only give you the initial premise: on their fifth anniversary, Nick Dunne’s beloved wife Amy disappears, and all signs point to very foul play indeed. Nick has to clear his name before the police finger him for Amy’s murder.”
Time

“Readers who prefer more virulent strains of unreality will appreciate the sneaky mind games of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, a thriller rooted in the portrait of a tricky and troubled marriage.”
New York Times

“[Flynn has] quite outdone herself with a tale of marital strife so deliciously devious that it moves the finish line on The War of the Roses… A novel studded with disclosures and guided by purposeful misdirection… Flynn delivers a wickedly clever cultural commentary as well as a complex and driven mystery… What fun this novel is.”
New York Daily News

“Flynn’s brilliantly constructed and consistently absorbing third novel begins on the Dunnes’ fifth wedding anniversary… The novel, which twists itself into new shapes, works as a page-turning thriller, but it’s also a study of marriage at its most destructive.”
Columbus Dispatch

“Gillian Flynn’s barbed and brilliant Gone Girl has two deceitful, disturbing, irresistible narrators and a plot that twists so many times you’ll be dizzy. This “catastrophically romantic” story about Nick and Amy is a “fairy tale reverse transformation” that reminded me of Patricia Highsmith in its psychological suspense and Kate Atkinson in its insanely clever plotting.”
Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“For a creepy, suspenseful mystery, Ms. Pearl suggested Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn, a novel due out this week. “You will not be able to figure out the end at all. I could not sleep the night after I read it. It’s really good,” Ms. [Nancy] Pearl said. “It’s about the way we deceive ourselves and deceive others.””
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“Gillian Flynn’s new novel, Gone Girl, is that rare thing: a book that thrills and delights while holding up a mirror to how we live… Through her two ultimately unreliable narrators, Flynn masterfully weaves the slow trickle of critical details with 90-degree plot turns… Timely, poignant and emotionally rich, Gone Girl will peel away your comfort levels even as you root for its protagonists—despite your best intuition.”
San Francisco Chronicle

“Flynn’s third noir thriller recently launched to even more acclaim than the first two novels, polishing her reputation for pushing crime fiction to a new literary level and as a craftsman of deliciously twisting and twisted plots.”
Kansas City Star

“I picked up Gone Girl because the novel is set along the Mississippi River in Missouri and the plot sounded intriguing. I put it down two days later, bleary-eyed and oh-so-satisfied after reading a story that left me surprised, disgusted, and riveted by its twists and turns… A good story presents a reader with a problem that has to be resolved and a few surprises along the way. A great story gives a reader a problem and leads you along a path, then dumps you off a cliff and into a jungle of plot twists, character revelations and back stories that you could not have imagined. Gone Girl does just that.”
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“To call Gillian Flynn’snew novel almost review-proof isn’t a put-down, it’s a fact. That’s because to give away the turn-of-the-screw in this chilling portrait of a marriage gone wrong would be a crime. I can say that Gone Girl is an ingenious whodunit for both the Facebook generation and old-school mystery buffs. Whoever you are, it will linger, like fingerprints on a gun… Flynn’s characters bloom and grow, like beautiful, poisonous plants. She is a Gothic storyteller for the Internet age.”
Cleveland Plain Dealer

About Book Club

Mission

The mission of the Online Books Club is to build a team of readers of all levels.

Why a Book Club?

I’ve always enjoyed reading and discussing books and getting suggestions for new books. With this book club, I have a platform to share my love of reading with an even larger audience.

How Does The Book Club Work?

Every month, I’ll recommend two books for our team of readers: one for the “Rookies” (younger folks) and the other for “Veterans” (more seasoned readers).

Timelines and reminders will be posted to make sure we are on track to finish the books.

How Do I Participate?

It’s really simple, there is no sign-up or login. Just find a copy of the current book and start reading!

The Online Books Club encourages people of all ages to read.

10 Best Books for Travelers That You Must Read in 2020

If you are looking for travel inspiration, you have landed in the right place. I have curated a list of 10 best books for travellers. These 10 books will encourage you to travel along with making your travel a self-exploration journey. 

Without wasting time let’s go through the list of my 10 best books for travellers.

#1. The Alchemist

This one of the most read books is all about following your dreams. “‘The Alchemist’ depicts an amazing story of an Andalusian shepherd who travels in search of a treasure. But finds himself, instead.

You will enjoy his journey from Spain to Egypt as he goes with the flow, and learns the meaning of life. 

This is a must-have book for you if you are a traveler and wanna read something valuable during your long journey. This book will help you overcome the fears of what to do with your life.

#2. Vagabonding

If you are a new to long-travels, then this is a must have book for you. You will learn valuable insights like saving money, planning your travels with lots of practical information. 

This will change your entire mindset about money. This may also help you how to spend your money in  a better way to extend your vacation.

This book talks about the process of taking off from your routine life and discover the world on your own terms.

#3. How To Travel The World On $50 A Day

In this NewYork Times bestseller, famous travel blogger Matt Kepnes aka Nomadic Matt talks about his journey in this book. 

How he’s stayed on the move for so long on a shoestring budget, with tips and tricks coming to life through relatable anecdotes. 

You will get practical knowledge on how to save money from your travels, enjoying life in less budget and also change your mindset about the world and mankind.

#4. The 4-hour workweek

This book has changed the lives of millions around the world, who left their 9 to 5 jobs, set out their own business, live a digital nomadic life, and travel the world. 

You will fascinate by reading author Tim Ferris’s working experiments like running a business while traveling and creating early mini-retirements for yourself.

#5. The Promise of a Pencil

This book tells you that anyone can create extraordinary change for those who need it most. 

Adam Braun traveled the world and during one of his trips, he met a young boy. When Adam asked him what he wanted most in the world, the boy replied “a pencil.” 

This hit Adam hard and started his Pencils of Promise, an organization that has built hundreds of schools in Nicaragua, Laos, and Thailand. They are providing full-time education to thousands of needy kids.

#6. A Woman Alone

If you always dreamt of going on solo trips but some fears set you back. This book will conquer your fears of exploring alone and encourage you to do it the way you want. 

You will love the relatable stories from solo female travelers that are real, transparent and uplifting. You will get that push you need to face your fears and see the world with only you.

#7. How NOT To Travel The World

The author tells the fears of a first-time solo traveler and ends up guiding you how to conquer your fears to live your dream.

She explains the emotional steps involved in her transformation. You will enjoy so many crazy situations of her travels, that make this book a very entertaining read.

#8. Unlikely Destinations

This book is a blend of autobiography, business history, and travel book. Written by Tony and Maureen Wheeler’s (the founders of Lonely Planet) who told their personal stories along with the success of lonely planet publishing house.

Along with their life journey, you will witness their big evolution to become the world’s largest independent travel publishing company.

#9. The Geography of Bliss

In this book, Eric Weiner narrates his travels around the globe including Iceland, Bhutan, Moldova, and Qatar and what he observed from his travels.

He explains, based on his travel experience, how different countries define and pursue happiness.

#10. Love With A Chance Of Drowning

Torre has written this travel memoir and tells how she leaves her corporate life to live on a sailboat with a man she just met.  She also takes you along on their adventure across the South Pacific together.

This book takes you on a beautiful, romantic and deeply personal journey of self-discovery. 

You will learn that chasing dreams is always scary, but usually worth it.